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Naples City
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Steve Abman
Steve Abman
Emmanuel ADDO-YOBO
Emmanuel ADDO-YOBO
Savvas Andronikou
Savvas Andronikou
Eugenio Baraldi
Eugenio Baraldi
Danielle Belgrave
Danielle Belgrave
Klaus Bonnelykke
Klaus Bonnelykke
Andrew Bush
Andrew Bush
Carlo Castellani
Carlo Castellani
Andrew Colin
Andrew Colin
Adnan Custovic
Adnan Custovic
Renato Cutrera
Renato Cutrera
Pierre Goussard
Pierre Goussard
Robert P. Guillerman
Robert P. Guillerman
Eitan Kerem
Eitan Kerem
Indu Khosla
Indu Khosla
Jane Kirkby
Jane Kirkby
Keith Klugman
Keith Klugman
Amir Kugelman
Amir Kugelman
Enrico Lombardi
Enrico Lombardi
Sooky Lum
Sooky Lum
Fernando Martinez
Fernando Martinez
Giovanni Morana
Giovanni Morana
Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
Giorgio Piacentini
Giorgio Piacentini
Giovanni Piedimonte
Giovanni Piedimonte
Christian Poets
Christian Poets
Petr Pohunek
Petr Pohunek
Jean-Paul Praud
Jean-Paul Praud
Giovanni Rossi
Giovanni Rossi
Bruce Rubin
Bruce Rubin
Sejal Saglani
Sejal Saglani
Francesca Santamaria
Francesca Santamaria
Isabelle Sermet-Gaudelus
Isabelle Sermet-Gaudelus
Florian Singer
Florian Singer
Peter Sly
Peter Sly
Manuel Soto-Martínez
Manuel Soto-Martínez
Renato Stein
Renato Stein
Alexander Tuazon
Alexander Tuazon
Mariapia Vila
Mariapia Vila
Tsu Fuh Yeh
Tsu Fuh Yeh
Heather Zar
Heather Zar

General Information

EXPO Convention Center Napoli    

Stazione Marittima
Molo Angioino
80133 Naples
Italy

Tel: +39 081 5514448
Fax: + 39 081 5519588              

Visit the website

 

 

Secretariat/Organizers

CIPP XIV Secretariat
Anne Flore Bidart, MD
E-mail: cipp@cipp-meeting.org
Website: www.cipp-meeting.org

 

Medi@xa
18 Rue Masséna
06000 Nice, France
Tel: +33 497 038 597 - Fax: +33 497 038 598
E-mail: abidart@mediaxa.com or pantonietti@mediaxa.com 

Climate

Naples in the Campania region of southern Italy exhibits a typical Mediterranean climate. The weather turns quite hot in Summer; cool and damp in the winter. It can be foggy along the coast in winter, although there will also be bright, sunny days which will be tolerable due to the usually mild evening temperatures.

Regulations for Foreign Visitors to Italy

Italy is a party to the Schengen Agreement. There are many countries whose citizens can visit Italy as tourists without a visa for up to 90 days within each 180-day period for tourist or business purposes. Your passport should be valid for at least three months beyond your intended date of departure from the Schengen area. You need sufficient funds and a return airline ticket. If your passport does not meet the Schengen requirements, you may be refused boarding by the airline at your point of origin or while transferring planes. You could also be denied entry when you arrive in the Schengen area. For this reason, we recommend that your passport have at least six months ‘validity remaining whenever you travel abroad. Please note that individual airlines and cruise companies may have additional, different requirements; be sure to confirm when purchasing tickets. For more information, kindly check with your local Italian embassy.

Currency

In Italy, as in most of  Western Europe, the official currency is the Euro (€). Money is best exchanged at bureaux de change and banks. There are also ATMs everywhere to withdraw cash, and in many shops and restaurants you can pay by card. 

Liability and Insurance

The Meeting Secretariat and organizers cannot accept liability for personal accidents or loss or damage to private property of participants and accompanying persons, either during or indirectly arising from the CIPP XV.

Transportations to Naples

Naples is the main transportation hub for southern Italy with several major train lines. The train and bus stations are in the huge Piazza Garibaldi, on the eastern side of the city. Naples has an airport, Aeroporto Capodichino, with flights to other parts of Italy and to Europe. A bus connects the airport with Piazza Garibaldi. Ferries and hydrofoils run from Molo Beverello to the islands of Capri, Ischia, Procida, and Sardinia.

By Plane

Naples Airport, also known as Capodichino Airport (IATA: NAP) is the international airport serving Naples. It's well organized and connected to the Center of the City with public transportation (5.9 km north-northeast of the city ) . The airport Capodichino has two terminal buildings: Terminal 1 is for departing travellers and Terminal 2, located away from the airfield, is used for charter operations. The airport is operated by GE.S.A.C., a corporation partially owned by the British airport company BAA.

From the airport you can take a bus for €3 (called Alibus) which has two stops only: Stazione Centrale (Central station) and Piazza Municipio, near the main ferry port (molo Beverello). You can buy your ticket on the bus. Further connections are listed on the page of the official website of the airport. 

Beware of illegal, unauthorized taxis and of anyone who may approach you directly. Authorized taxis are clearly visible at the exit; fixed fares exist for a number of destinations, and must be clearly shown in the cab. Make sure they are before getting on the cab and threaten to call the police ("polizia") should the taxi driver try to push back.

By Train

The main station is Napoli Centrale - Piazza Garibaldi Station, connected to the Naples subway system. The buses R2 or 601 from the Piazza Garibaldi in front of the train station will take you within three blocks of the ferries at Stazione Marittima. Other stations include Mergellina, a magnificent Art Déco building and Campi Flegrei. The costs of trains from / to Rome vary a lot, ranging from a 10.50€ 3-hour regional train to 1-hour 10-minute high speed FrecciaRossa starting at 29€ . The new high speed train Italo (provided by the private company NTV) offers competitive prices (booking in advance the price can be just 19€).

By Boat

Cruise ships dock at Stazione Marittima, a large terminal located right in the city.

By Car

Naples is directly connected with Rome by the A1 highway, and the trip takes generally less than 2 hours. Due to traffic jam and parking shortage in city center, it's advisable to leave your car in a parking lot near the motorway exit or your accommodation, and to use public transportation.

By Bus

Many national and international private bus services operate in Naples, generally stopping at Piazza Garibaldi or Piazza Municipio.

About the city

Naples is the capital of the Italian region Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy, after Rome and Milan. As of 2014, around 989,845 people live within the city's administrative limits. The Metropolitan City of Naples has a population of 3,128,700. Naples is the 9th-most populous urban area in the European Union with a population of between 3 million and 3.7 million. About 4 million people live in the Naples metropolitan area, one of the largest metropolises on the Mediterranean Sea.

Naples is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world.

 

Historic City Center

Naples' historic city centre is the largest in Europe, covering 1,700 hectares (4,200 acres) and enclosing 27 centuries of history, and is listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. Naples has long been a major cultural centre with a global sphere of influence, particularly during the Renaissance and Enlightenment eras. In the immediate vicinity of Naples are numerous culturally and historically significant sites, including the Palace of Caserta and the Roman ruins of Pompeii and Herculaneum. Culinarily, Naples is synonymous with pizza, which originated in the city. Neapolitan music has furthermore been highly influential, credited with the invention of the romantic guitar and the mandolin, as well as notable contributions to opera and folk standards. Popular characters and historical figures who have come to symbolise the city include Januarius, the patron saint of Naples, the comic figure Pulcinella, and the Sirens from the Greek epic poem the Odyssey. According to CNN, the metro stop "Toledo" is the most beautiful in Europe and it won also the LEAF Award '2013 as "Public building of the year".

Piazza Plebiscito

Piazza del Plebiscito

National Archeological Museum

The museum contains a large collection of Roman artifacts from Pompeii, Stabiae and Herculaneum. The collection includes works of the highest quality produced in Greek, Roman and Renaissance times. It is the most important Italian archaeological museum and is considered one of the most important in the world.

Charles III of Spain founded the museum in the 1750s. The building he used for it had been erected as a cavalry barracks and during its time as the seat of the University of Naples (from 1616 to 1777) was extended, in the late 18th century.

The museum hosts extensive collections of Greek and Roman antiquities. Their core is from the Farnese Collection, which includes a collection of engraved gems (including the Farnese Cup, a Ptolemaic bowl made of sardonyx agate and the most famous piece in the "Treasure of the Magnificent", and is founded upon gems collected by Cosimo de' Medici and Lorenzo il Magnifico in the 15th century) and the Farnese Marbles. Among the notable works found in the museum are the Herculaneum papyri, carbonized by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, found after 1752 in Villa of the Papyri. 

 

Pompeii and Herculaneum

Sand-swept Egyptian pyramids, gondolas slicing through a Venetian canal, a geisha’s enticing perfume as she toddles by in a small district in Kyoto. These moments are what travelers the world over seek: an evocation of the past, a platform for understanding history’s complexities, context.

For lovers of the Roman era, only Pompeii and neighboring Herculaneum offer this and more. Their swift destruction provided a vacuum seal on the past for which archeologists are eternally grateful. Today visitors to Italy place Pompeii and the smaller site of Herculaneum on their south of Rome itinerary without fail – because with a visit of only a few short hours, the imagination is fueled with a lifetime of memories.

Capella Sansevero

The Cappella Sansevero (also known as the Capella Sansevero de' Sangri or Pietatella) is a chapel located on Via Francesco de Sanctis 19, just northwest of the church of San Domenico Maggiore, in the historic center of Naples, Italy. The chapel is more properly named the Chapel of Santa Maria della Pietà, or the Pietatella. It contains works of art by some of the leading Italian artists of the 18th century.

Its origin dates to 1590 when John Francesco di Sangro, Duke of Torremaggiore, after recovering from a serious illness, had a private chapel built in what were then the gardens of the nearby Sansevero family residence, the Palazzo Sansevero. The building was converted into a family burial chapel by Alessandro di Sangro in 1613 (as inscribed on the marble plinth over the entrance to the chapel). Definitive form was given to the chapel by Raimondo di Sangro, Prince of Sansevero, who also included Masonic symbols in its reconstruction. Until 1888 a passageway connected the Sansevero palace with the chapel.

The chapel received its alternative name of Pietatella from a painting of the Virgin Mary (La Pietà), spotted there by an unjustly arrested prisoner, as reported in the book "Napoli Sacra" by Cesare d'Engenio Caracciolo in 1623. When the chapel was constructed it was originally dedicated to Santa Maria della Pietà, after the painting. 

Cristo Velato - San Severo Chapel

Cristo Velato - San Severo Chapel

Naples Underground 

Running beneath the Italian city of Naples and the surrounding area is an underground geothermal zone called the "Campi Flegrei" ("fiery fields"). This geothermal area runs generally from Mount Vesuvius beneath a wide area including Pompei, Herculaneum, Naples and over to Pozzuoli and the coastal Baia area. Mining and various infrastructure projects during several millennia have formed extensive caves and underground structures in the zone.

Castel dell'Ovo

Castel dell'Ovo (in Italian, Egg Castle) is a seaside castle located on the former island of Megaride, now a peninsula, on the Gulf of Naples. The castle's name comes from a legend about the Roman poet Virgil, who had a reputation in medieval times as a great sorcerer and predictor of the future. In the legend, Virgil put a magical egg into the foundations to support the fortifications. Had this egg been broken, the castle would have been destroyed and a series of disastrous events would have involved the city of Naples. The castle is located between the districts of San Ferdinando and Chiaia, opposite the zone of Mergellina.

 

Castel dell'Ovo

Castel dell'Ovo

The Almafi Coast 

The Amalfi Coast (Italian: Costiera Amalfitana) is a stretch of coastline on the southern coast of the Sorrentine Peninsula in the Province of Salerno in Southern Italy. The Amalfi Coast is a popular tourist destination for the region and Italy as a whole, attracting thousands of tourists annually. During the 10th–11th centuries, the Duchy of Amalfi existed on the territory of the Amalfi Coast, centered in the town of Amalfi. The Amalfi coast was later controlled by the Principality of Salerno, until Amalfi was sacked by the Republic of Pisa in 1137. Since then the Amalfi coast has experienced a crisis.In 1997, the Amalfi Coast was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site as a cultural landscape.

Like the rest of the region, the Amalfi Coast lies in a Mediterranean climate, featuring warm summers and mild winters. It is located on the relatively steep southern shore of the Sorrentine Peninsula, leaving little room for rural and agricultural territories. The only land route to the Amalfi Coast is the 40 kilometres (25 mi) long Strada Statale 163 which runs along the coastline from the town of Vietri sul Mare in the east to Positano in the west. Thirteen municipalities are located on the Amalfi Coast, many of them centered around tourism.

The Amalfi Coast is known for its production of limoncello liqueur as the area is a known cultivator of lemons, known as sfusato amalfitano in Italian, which are grown in terraced gardens along the entire coast between February and October. Amalfi is also a known maker of a hand-made thick paper which is called bambagina. Other renowned local products are a particular kind of anchovies (local Italian: alici) from Cetara, and the colorful handmade ceramics from Vietri.

Almafi Coast - photo by « Canadastock/Shutterstock »The Almafi Coast - photo by « Canadastock/Shutterstock »

MADRE Museum of Contemporary Art 

MADRE, Museum of contemporary Art DonnaREgina, is located in the heart of old Naples, on what is known as the “Via dei Musei,” just a stone’s throw away from the Duomo, the Museo Archeologico Nazionale and the Accademia di Belle Arti (Galleria d’Arte Moderna), where the ancient San Lorenzo district is situated.

The Museum takes its name from the building that hosts it, the Palazzo Donnaregina, which like all the surrounding area owes its name to the Monastery of Santa Maria Donnaregina, founded by the Swabians (13th century) and then expanded and rebuilt in 1325 by Queen Mary of Hungary, wife to Charles II of Anjou. All that remains of the ancient monastic complex is the church of the same name, which overlooks Piazza Donnaregina, built in the Baroque period, and the “old” 14th-century Gothic-style church of Donnaregina, which has previously hosted exhibitions and special events organized by the Museum.

On June 10, 2005 the Madre inaugurated its spaces with the opening of site-specific installations in the rooms on the first floor; between 2005 and 2006 the whole building was completed, and the rooms on the second floor were opened to the public. These rooms host part of the collection, while the rooms on the third floor are used for temporary exhibitions.

Photo gallery

 

Monastero di Santa Chiara

Monastero di Santa ChiaraNaples Underground

Naples Underground 

 

Piazza Reale

Piazza Reale

Teatro San Carlo

Teatro San Carlo

Bay of Naples

Gulf of Naples