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CIPP XI : Bangkok, Thailand, June 30 - July 2, 2012

General Informations

 

General Information
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General information

 

Venue

PALACIO DE CONGRESOS
Av Cortes Valencianas 60
46015 - Valencia
Spain
www.palcongres-vlc.com/

Secretariat
Anne Flore Bidart, MD
E-mail: cipp@cipp-meeting.org
Website: www.cipp-meeting.org

Organizers
Medi@xa
27 Rue Masséna
06000 Nice, France
Tel: +33 497 038 597 - Fax: +33 497 038 598
E-mail: mrsegura@mediaxa.com / cbordon@mediaxa.com


Climate 
The average temperature in Valencia in June ranges between 20°C-30°C.
 
Regulations for Foreign Visitors to Spain
Some participants might request Visas in order to access to the country.
Please check with your local Spanish Embassy.
www.maec.es/en 

Currency
The Euro is the standard currency unit.

Liability and Insurance
The Meeting Secretariat and organizers cannot accept liability for personal accidents or loss or damage to private property of participants and accompanying persons, either during or indirectly arising from the CIPP XII.

 

Airport Information


VALENCIA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (Manises)
Info Service Phone +34 961 598 500
Distance from the airport to the city centre: 8 Km.

AIRPORT – CITY CENTRE CONNECTION:
- By metro: Line 5 Aeropuerto/Torrent Avinguda- Neptú. Approx. every 10-20 minutes. Line 3 Aeropuerto / Palmaret- Rafelbunyol. Approx. every 10-20 minutes Fare to/from city centre: approx. €2.
- By bus: Fernanbus, Line 150 Valencia - Manises - Aeropuerto: Timetable: Airport-Valencia: 6:30, 7:00, then every 20 minutes until 22:00, 22:30, 23:10 and 23:45. Price: approx. €1.25
- By Taxi: Approx. cost airport-city centre: approx. €20. - By car: Take the V-11 road which connects the A-3 (Madrid to Valencia motorway) with the V-30.

*** SPECIAL DISCOUNTS ARE OFFERED TO CIPP PARTICIPANTS with IBERIA AIRLINES and RENFE Railways.

For further information please check "Hotels, Travel & Tours"

 

About the city

 

Located on the east Mediterranean coast of the Iberian Peninsula, Valencia is Spain’s third largest city after Madrid and Barcelona and has quickly become one of the countries most exciting.

A city with over 2,000 years of history that looks defiantly towards the future without forgetting its roots.
From traditional paella to its world-famous Las fallas festival, Valencia has plenty to offer in terms of festivities and tradition making it one of the most interesting and important cities in Spain.

Valencia surprises with a river converted into a 11-kilometre long garden, and distinguishes itself from most other tourist destinations with its combination of traditional old city charm in the Carmen area, beach life in the splendid el Saler and Malvarrosa districts and modern prosperity and economic ambition in the chic shopping areas of Colón and the Plaza del Ayuntamiento.

Valencia is host to the heats and finals of the America’s Cup races and the European Formula 1 Grand Prix.

Consired the jewel in the crown of the Costa del Azahar, Valencia has the advantage of not being too overcrowded like its larger contemporaries, while still managing to cram a huge amount of top class hotels, restaurants, bars and clubs into its relatively small city centre. More and more direct flights are arriving to this beautiful city wideworld.

Valencia is one of the most beautiful cities in the country; with its exuberant variety of perfectly kept flora and lush gardens as well as breathtaking architecture and visitor attractions.

HISTORY OF VALENCIA

Valencia was first inhabited by the Iberians; then the Greeks, Romans, Visigoths and Muslims settled down in the province.

Valencia city history has been greatly influenced by Roman civilisation. Nevertheless, the subsequent Muslim influence was even greater to the extent that the population of this place was essentially Muslim except for a short lived conquest by the Cid in 1088.

The nationalistic side of Valencia, with its own political identity, originated in 1238 when King James I conquered the city of Valencia. Nevertheless, it held its own autonomy as a kingdom within the group of States under King James” control instead of being annexed to Catalonia or Aragon. Valencia has its own identity as a self governing state with its own institutions and parliament.

After the Middle Ages, economic growth was subject to sudden halts, such as the war of the ‘Germanias’ (1519-1522) and the expulsion of the ‘Moriscos’ in 1616, which marked the beginning of its decline.

People from Valencia took Austria”s Archduke”s side in the War of Succession at the beginning of the 1700s while most of the nobles were favouring Phillip V, whose success brought about the end of the region”s autonomy as well as the abolition of local charters.

Valencia Tourist Office